HOUSING PLANS

1942 Saint Louis After World War II
1953 Let's Look at Housing: A Report on Housing Conditions in Selected Areas of St. Louis
1977 Residential Reuse - A Manual of Design and Construction, Methods and Techniques
1979 Economic Impact of the Multiple Resource Nomination to the National Register of Historic Places on the St. Louis Central Business District


1942 SAINT LOUIS AFTER WORLD WAR II

By: City Planning Commission
Pub: October 16, 1942

This plan was designed to address post World War II economic and social issues confronting the City of St. Louis at that time. A number of trends showed the need to maintain population control. As a result, blighted areas were set aside for the construction of large housing projects. Several trends pointed to the decline of the City:

Population Trends - as more people moved out of the St. Louis city limits, the City was inevitably faced with the burden of higher taxes, tax delinquency and foreclosures. Area of Population Loss - the population loss had doubled over the past twenty years (from 1920-1940), embracing fifty-six percent of the City's area.

Housing Trends:

A realistic land program was proposed and several recommendations were made:

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1953 LET'S LOOK AT HOUSING:

A REPORT ON HOUSING CONDITIONS IN SELECTED AREAS OF ST. LOUIS

By: City Planning Department
Pub: August 12, 1953

This report is a survey of the housing conditions within the City of St. Louis. The St. Louis housing survey was authorized by the Minimum Housing Standards Ordinance which was the initial step in the Housing Rehabilitation Project. The purpose of this report was to establish a classification system for deteriorating housing stock and to cite the areas where housing preservation, improvement or demolition would be appropriate. In addition, the survey would be used as a planning tool for St. Louis, as well as for other cities, to help establish housing standards for residential areas. The survey relied on both the dwelling and the neighborhood environment to determine the character and condition of the housing area.

Three types of housing areas were established, based on the prevailing housing conditions of that area:

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1977 RESIDENTIAL REUSE

A MANUAL OF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION METHODS AND TECHNIQUES

By: Prepared by Robert C. Craycroft and Randall A. Spurr
For: St. Louis Community Development Agency
Pub: no date listed

This document is a general manual for anyone involved in residential reuse in urban areas, such as, architects, large developers and contractors, government agencies and individual homeowners. The purpose of this step- by-step reuse manual was to encourage historical building preservation through methods of reuse. This manual was designed to aid in the decision making regarding reuse design methods, reuse in business, and construction techniques.

It also lists the general guidelines for rehabilitating old buildings. Basically, this manual describes the characteristics of reuse activity, identifies the major issues surrounding the urban residential rehabilitation process, and describes the reuse techniques which cover in detail, the process of rehabilitating the interior and exterior of buildings.

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1979 ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE MULTIPLE RESOURCE NOMINATION TO THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES ON THE ST. LOUIS CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

By: Economic Research Associates
With: Csaplar and Bok and Roger P. Lang, AIA
For: Community Development Agency of St. Louis, Missouri.
Pub: no date listed

The proposed economic impact report was first completed by the Landmarks Association of St. Louis in 1978; it was approved by the State Historic Officers and forwarded for federal review. This document is an economic report of the proposed districts and site nominations for historical preservation in the St. Louis Central Business District. The nomination proposal includes sixty- five buildings located in five districts and on four individual sites within the Central Business District.

The following districts and sites were proposed to the National Register of Historic Places:

Districts - the Financial District; the Union Market District; the Hadley Dean District; the Old Post Office; Real Estate Row District.

Single Sites - Town Theater; Southwestern Bell Telephone Company; Western Union Building; Loews State Theater.

The report was outlined as follows:

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