URBAN RENEWAL AND DOWNTOWN PLANS

1919 A Public Building Group Plan for St. Louis
1953 Rebuilding Industry - Commerce in St. Louis
1959 Mansion House Redevelopment Project
1960 A Plan for Downtown St. Louis
1973 Concept for a New Town in the City
1974 A Plan for Downtown St. Louis
1985 St. Louis 1985: A Profile at Mid-Decade
1987 A Plan for Downtown St. Louis: Visions of the Future
1990 The Gate District - Report to the Community Development Agency, City of St. Louis


1919 A PUBLIC BUILDING GROUP PLAN FOR ST. LOUIS

By: City Plan Commission
Pub: no date listed

The principal concept of this plan was to create a mall between the Municipal Courts Building, City Hall and the Public Library. This could only be achieved by condemning the property and razing all the buildings in the three blocks bounded by Fourteenth Street, Market Street, Thirteenth Street. and Olive Street. The new buildings would be built between Olive and Market in the area between Fifteenth and Fourteenth Streets and in the area between Thirteenth and Twelfth Streets.

The following new buildings would be built: a Municipal Auditorium and Community Center Building, a Court House, a Hall of Records, a Federal Building and a State Building. The buildings together would complete a rectangular design in which the frontages of the buildings would face each other, therefore, creating a mall.

Return to the top of this section


1953 REBUILDING INDUSTRY - COMMERCE IN ST. LOUIS

By: City Plan Commission
Pub: April 23, 1953

This is an urban redevelopment plan that was designed by private interests and the City of St. Louis, to clear slum areas that were centrally located in the City, in order to make room for commercial, industrial and residential expansion. This project was supported by local interests and state and federal legislation. The authorization of large cities to exercise their right of eminent domain was granted by the Urban Redevelopment Corporation Act of the Missouri Legislature in 1946. In addition, Title I of the Federal Housing Act of 1949 provides for slum clearance and redevelopment with subsidization by the Federal government. The following redevelopment areas were selected:

DeSoto-Carr Area

South Broadway Area

Market Street Area

Return to the top of this section


1959 MANSION HOUSE REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT

By: Mansion House Redevelopment Corporations
Pub: July 30, 1959

Area of Concern: 9.13 Acre Development area at the Eastern edge of Downtown St. Louis, bounded by Memorial Drive (Third Street), Chestnut Street, Fourth Street, and Washington Avenue. The project would be immediately adjacent on the West of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial National Parks.

The idea behind this project was to use the mechanism of urban renewal to clear areas that were declared blighted by the City of St. Louis; and to redevelop these areas by providing innovative housing and commercial opportunities. The main focus of this project was to create a new way of urban life, by creating an environment of luxurious living with optimum in amenities and convenience.

Major elements of the development plan are documented by the following developments:

Return to the top of this section


1960 A PLAN FOR DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS

By: City Plan Commission
Pub: no date listed

Area of Survey: The Central Business District -- generally form Third Street to Twentieth Street and from Poplar to Cole

This comprehensive plan is a proposal for the revitalization and renewal of the downtown area. The plan establishes the basic framework for traffic and land use. Several planning elements were designed to create economic stability, beautification and investment through emphasis in compactness, accessibility, local circulation, separation of pedestrians and vehicles, pedestrian malls, central parkways, redevelopment, rehabilitation and civic design.

The planning areas were established as follows:

Return to the top of this section


1973 CONCEPT FOR A NEW TOWN IN THE CITY

By: City Plan Commission
Pub: January 1973

Area of New Development: to the North, Delmar Boulevard, to the South, Lafayette and I-44, to the East, the North-South Distributor and to the West, Vandeventer and Thirty-ninth Street.

The concept of a New Town in the City is based primarily on the idea of creating a quality environment that incorporates the luxury of suburban living with the convenience and vitality of city living. The plan was backed by the Urban Growth and New Community Development Act of 1970, which supplements existing city, state and federal mechanisms to encourage major new private investments.

This document illustrates the process of creating a new town in the City of St. Louis. It would be located in the midtown area just West of the Central Business District including Lafayette Square, Laclede Town and the proposed area of new development. The "New Town" would cover a total of 1250 acres; with units estimated at 18,500, this development would house 40,000 to 50,000 people of various socio-economic backgrounds.

This concept consists of the following elements:

Return to the top of this section


1974 A PLAN FOR DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS

By: City Plan Commission
Pub: no date listed

Area of Concern: bound by the Mississippi River on the East, the proposed North-South Distributor Highway at Twenty-First Street on the West, Chouteau Avenue on the South and Cole Street on the North.

This planning document was written for public distribution prior to its adoption as an element of the master plan for the City of St. Louis. The purpose of this plan was to accommodate investment and development in order to encourage commercial, service and professional activity in the Central Business District. The focus of this plan was be to reinforce the downtown area as the point of regional focus, to make maximum use of existing assets, resources and potential, and to establish action programs and recommendations which would be attainable over a fifteen year period. In addition, this plan highlighted the need for beautification, open space, solutions for traffic congestion and direct road systems that link the core of downtown to suburban areas.

The key elements of the Downtown Plan included the following:

Return to the top of this section


1985 ST. LOUIS 1985: A PROFILE AT MID-DECADE

SELECTED INFORMATION ABOUT POPULATION, HOUSING, ECONOMY AND MANY OTHER ASPECTS OF THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS

By: Community Development Agency
Pub: March 1985

The introduction of this document reviews a short history of the City of St. Louis; the majority of the report includes a series of graphic maps, charts and tables that show a variety of statistical information about the City of St. Louis. This report presents statistics on population; housing; economic conditions; commerce and industry; economic development; income and employment; transportation and utilities; education; health and safety; government; and demographic forecasts.

The statistical data dates back as far as the late sixties up to the year 1985. At the time of publication, this report was considered technological prototype as far as the type of software that was used and the quality of graphics that were produced.

Return to the top of this section


1987 A PLAN FOR DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS: VISIONS OF THE FUTURE

By: Prepared by Tom Martinson
For: St. Louis Development Corporation
Pub: no date listed

This document discusses the long and short term planning elements for Downtown St. Louis. The plan proposes a number of improvements to municipal policies and procedures, including land use, zoning and recommendations for capital budgeting and development incentives.

Five, so called visionary plans for the downtown area were the focus of this report:

Return to the top of this section


1990 THE GATE DISTRICT

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AGENCY CITY OF ST. LOUIS

By: Andre Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Town Planners, The Lawrence Group Architects, and Development Strategies, Inc.
Pub: October 29, 1990

Area of Concern: I-44 and Lafayette Avenue are to the South, Grand Avenue to the West, Chouteau Avenue is to the North and Jefferson is to the East.

This document is the master plan for the Gate District. It attempts to design a comprehensive plan for the area. The following elements make up the Master Plan: to rename the area from Lafayette Town to The Gate District; to create distinct neighborhoods with gate entrances: (Caroline Park, Buder Park, Eads Park, Saint Vincent Park, Louisiana Park, Lafayette Terrace); to create land use sectors: (Institutional, Light Industrial, Park Avenue Commercial, Floral, Lafayette Commercial, Mixed Use); to create small parks; to beautify the streets; to refurbish alleys; to provide a school; to preserve and enhance architectural design; to establish new codes and an administration, and to conduct an advertising campaign to promote the Gate District.

Return to the top of this section