Central West End


19th Century Development

19th Century Development

Compton and Dry's 1875 pictorial atlas shows the Central West End area as largely semi-rural. East of Kingshighway, some streets had been laid out in Lindell's Second Addition, while to the west the principal avenues were Union in a north-south direction and the Olive Street Road, now Delmar, running to the west. A few large houses are shown along Lindell Avenue and Bates Avenue, now Duncan Avenue. Levin H. Baker occupied a large house with a mansard roof on the northwest corner of Lindell and Taylor and T. J. Peter resided in a similar house on the south side of Lindell, west of Sarah Street. They were the only houses then fronting on Lindell between Spring Avenue and Kingshighway. A large Italianate mansion on the west side of Cornelia (Newstead) at Maryland Avenue was the home of Nathan Coleman.

On either side of the present Duncan Avenue to the east of Euclid, were two large country houses and farms occupied by John T. McCune and J. W. Booth, respectively. On the west side of Euclid, was the Merriman place and across Kingshighway just south of Laclede Avenue was the old John P. Cabanne country home, which was used as a park cottage in 1875. This brick house was the earliest structure built in the area, constructed in 1819 and unjustifiably razed by the park department in 1881. A more densely populated portion of the vicinity was located around Clayton and Manchester roads, west of the Rock Spring area. To the north of Lindell and east of Kingshighway, the land was very sparsely settled with Washington and Delmar terminating at a diagonal stretch of Olive Street Road running from the present Olive and Pendleton to Delmar and Taylor.

The largest house in this section was that of George P. Dorris at the southwest corner of Kingshighway and Delmar, occupying a large estate with pretentious stables. North of the park and west of Kingshighway, where Portland and Westmoreland Places are now located, was the Cabanne dairy farm. Along the west side of Union Avenue were a number of country houses, closest to Forest Park was the Waterman family home, a large Victorian mansion with a square tower. At the southwest corner of Delmar and Union was the home of Daniel Bell, whose estate was later developed into Washington Terrace. A single track railroad line ran along the present right-of-way of the Wabash (Norfolk and Western) Railroad. Near the present DeBaliviere Avenue entrance in Forest Park was the Pavilion, a restaurant in a converted former farm house. It was reached by a long drive over the new park roads.