City of St. Louis Department of Health Monitors Uptick in COVID-19 Cases Among Younger Segments of Population

The Department of Health wants parents and guardians to continue to keep their children in
healthy and safe environments as we navigate this pandemic.

April 8, 2021 | 2 min reading time

The City of St. Louis Department of Health is monitoring a nationwide rise of COVID-19 cases among younger segments of the population, including youth. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has attributed part of the increase to youth sports and extra-curriculum activities. This rise in cases over the past four weeks is particularly concerning as many other segments of our adult population becomes vaccinated and COVID-19 variants are identified.

“When previous weeks of the pandemic in the City of St. Louis are compared to the past couple of weeks we find there has been an increase in cases among younger segments of the population,” says Dr. Fredrick Echols, acting director of health for the City of St. Louis. “Although residents age 20-29 and 30-39 continue to be the primary driver of cases in the City of St. Louis there has been an uptick in cases among youth. For this time period, compared to the entire pandemic the portion of cases for individuals 0-19 years of age has more than doubled from 10% of all cases to 22%.”

The Department of Health is mindful that the increases appearing in the nationwide reports and the case reports in the City of St. Louis may be the result of the change in relative proportion of cases, as fewer cases are reported in older age groups. This could be due to older groups being vaccinated, whereas children are not yet eligible.

The Department of Health wants parents and guardians to continue to keep their children in healthy and safe environments as we continue to navigate through this unprecedented pandemic. Social distancing for all children and face coverings for children 9 years of age and above, remain effective ways to prevent SARS CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Make sure your child knows to avoid closed spaces, especially those with poor ventilation and where physical distancing cannot occur, crowded areas, and gatherings where there are activities that create and spread respiratory droplets. Properly wearing a face covering when in public and when around people your child does not live with also reduces their risk. 

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